Stargate address book

Stargate

If you have built a Stargate of your own as seen on this site, you have the option to dial other stargates over the internet. You can also set up a stargate address on your gate and have it accept incoming wormholes from others. You can find more information on how to to this further down on this page.

Custom made stargates addresses:

The addresses below are ready to accept incoming wormholes. The status is updated every 10 minutes. (refresh of the page is required). You need to reboot your stargate in order to dial newly added stargates in this table.

Stargate/planet AddressStatus
Kristian Tysse
GETafU
Online
Tesseract
ULSCWg
Offline
Tython
GmPTfZ
Offline
Jon Moyes
LRZGhK
Offline
Estros
GHTglUB
Offline
eXos
dgaKLl
Offline
Sepa’s Sanctum
LEIWHm
Offline
PX1-482 JonathanS Gate
jLgCBY
Online
Proxima Centauri B
BQVadm
Offline
Fras Alpha Gate
IVCNkF
Offline
Serenity
LCTJSV
Offline
Cyathea
fIUdRc
Offline
Cassidy
CdLebR
Offline
Vasut’s gate
eWBdGP
Offline
New Horizon
IFPLCH
Offline
Vasut’s second gate
fLFCRB
Online
Abythres
GFIJKL
Online
The.Continuum
mSQEcU
Offline
Centauri Prime
LSDNYa
Offline

These are known hardcoded addresses you can dial from your stargate:

Stargate/PlanetAddress
ABYDOS
aGOfLd
APOPHIS’S BASE
TRKlJf
CASTIANA or SAHAL
cCFILP
SAHAL or CASTIANA
cRSTUV
CHULAK
IBWOkT
CLAVA THESSARA INFINITAS
NUPKdG
CLAVA THESSARA INFINITAS2
ZTifWD
DESTROYERS
CfPHJL
EARTH
bZEjKc
EDORA
bliIOC
EURONDA
daIGRP
JUNA
cHRVDY
KALLANA
FPHCZY
KHEB
ZiFHWN
K’TAU
RBdLZg
MARTIN LLOYD’S HOMEWORLD
XLfGKh
NID OFF-WORLD BASE
lbOiCS
OTHALA
KaWPgCI
P2X-555
bHPgMe
P34-353J
lIbOiC
P3W-451 (black hole)
SHDkZP
P3X-118
IZhkQU
P3X-562
CbIiXO
P9C-372
YHRhDV
PB5-926
LjWRGa
PX1 – 767
TBiHZO
PRACLARUSH TAONAS
iCecEQ
SANGREAL PLANET
dShIgR
TARTARUS
gbWZPe
TOLLAN
FgakKR
TOLLANA
DhHVRY
VAGON BREI
CHBLSd
FINAL DESTINATION
IRaOUj
LANTIA (ATLANTIS)
SUBPOHT
DESTINY
FQUeiXEN

How does it work?

To make it possible to dial other stargates over the internet, we need to do some choices in regards to the logic of the dialling itself. In the series we see chevrons lighting up one by one on incoming wormholes and it looks and feels like they light up on the incoming side simultaneously while the Stargate is being dialled from the outgoing side. This is of course not actually possible since the receiving gate cannot know it is being dialled until all the chevrons are locked.

I have chosen a method that mimics this behaviour as close as possible. I want the chevrons on the incoming stargate to light up as soon as possible while dialling from a remote gate. In some episodes the ring also spins on incoming wormholes, but that seems to be the exception and not the norm. On our gates the ring is not spinning on incoming wormholes. Knowing if we are dialling a custom made Stargate is not feasible after inputting just one symbol on the DHD. But with just two symbols we can already check and see if the receiving stargate is a known stargate built by someone as described on this site or not.

If we exclude the earth symbol from the first two symbols in the address (It feels wrong to use the earth symbol as other than a point of origin (seventh symbol), this gives us the possibility of 37 * 36 = 1332 unique addresses separated by the first two symbols only. Retracting the 35 already hard coded known addresses from the show (I got most of those from this site: https://www.rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/index.htm ) we end up with 1297 usable addresses where we can differentiate them using only the first two symbols. I think this is more than enough and if we need more, we can do the same but including 3 symbols instead, which gives more than 46 000 addresses.

Using the mentioned method with the two unique symbols, when dialling the first symbol nothing happens on the receiving stargate. But on the second symbol we already know what stargate to dial and we can start lighting up symbols on the correct remote stargate. Since it takes a while to lock each chevron on the origin stargate we often put in the second symbol before the first one is locked. That way the first symbol can be lit up on the receiving stargate at the same time as on the origin stargate. Kind of neat I think. One still needs to dial all 6 correct symbols (and any point of origin symbol) in order to achieve a connection and establish a wormhole. For instance if you dial the first 4 symbols correctly, but the last symbols wrong, only the 4 correct chevrons light up on the receiving gate, and a wormhole is not established.

In the show the gate network does not use a centralised hub/server/hardware/thingy for dialling between gates. They seem to work like a full mesh where every gate can communicate to the other gates via subspace. I have used the same method for our Stargate Network. This means the Stargates are not dependant on a common server where every gate logs in and use as a common point for communication. (gateway). But every Stargate is it’s own server and can accept incoming wormholes directly. This way it is also easy for anyone (friends who has made their own stargates for instance) to set up their own addresses and be able to dial each other without the rest of the common Stargate network knowing about it. Dialling other gates on the local network is also easy and can be done directly from gate to gate without the need of a server on the Internet. However, to be part of the official stargate network (subspace) and have your stargate show up as online in the above address list, your stargate needs to be connected to the subspace VPN network. Read more about that below.

How do I add my stargate to the Stargate network to accept incoming wormholes?

Every gate that you want to add to the “Official Stargate Network (subspace)” and make available for others to dial over the internet, needs a unique Stargate address and an IP address in subspace (the VPN network). If you want’ your Stargate “out there” for others to dial, you will have to choose a Stargate address that’s unique and not already in use. (The first two symbols cannot be used in other knows addresses) You need to send this Stargate Address and your subspace public key to me so I can add it to the database and give you an IP address for use in subspace.

Step 1 – Choose a stargate address

First you need to choose an address for your stargate. This will be a unique address for your stargate alone. The address will be put in the table on top of this page so that others can dial your stargate and establish a wormhole. You need to choose 6 symbols for the address. When you know what symbols you want to use for your stargate address you need to convert those to a format that the program can use. Each symbol is represented with a number and a stargate address looks like this [7, 5, 20, 27, 32, 21]. You can check what number represents what symbol in this document. When you have chosen the address you need to make sure it’s unique and not in use by any other stargates or known planets. The first two symbols cannot be the same as the first two symbols in other known addresses. I have made a simple script to help check if your chosen address is usable. The script is already present on your raspberry pi and you can run it like shown here. First ssh to your raspberry pi with the pi user:

pi@raspberrypi:~ $/home/sg1/sg1_venv/bin/python /home/sg1/sg1/check_address.py '[8, 6, 21, 28, 12, 11]'
CONGRATULATIONS, there are no conflicts with your chosen address; [8, 6, 21, 28, 12, 11]

Step 2 – Apply the address in the stargate program

When you have your stargate address you need to add it to the stargate program on the raspberry pi, so that the stargate knows it’s own address. The address is located within a file, and you simply need to swap out the “default” address with your own address. SSH to the raspberry pi and run the following command to open the file in a text editor:

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo nano /home/sg1/sg1/stargate_address.py

Locate the following line and swap out the numbers in the “default” address with the numbers from your address (in the correct order). Don’t change anything else, just the numbers themselves. Press “CTRL + O” and then “Enter” to save the file and “CTRL + X” to exit.

local_stargate_address = [7, 5, 20, 27, 32, 21]

Make a note of the chosen stargate address, as you will need it in step 4.

Step 3 – Connecting to subspace (part 1)

Sadly, the there are no routing protocols on the Internet that routes stargate address. Nor do we have access to “the real subspace” and will have to rely on good old fashion IP addressing for communication between our stargates.

To isolate our stargates from the rest of the Internet and add a layer of security we carve out our own little subspace network on the internet and use this for stargate communications. This subspace network only allows stargate and ICMP communications. If you used the downloadable image to setup the raspberry pi, you should have all the necessary bits ready to join subspace. If not, there are details on the page here for how to install the VPN software (wireguard).

To join subspace I need to know the public key for your stargate. SSH into your raspberry pi and run the following commands:

sg1@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo -i
root@raspberrypi:~# cd /etc/wireguard/
root@raspberrypi:/etc/wireguard# umask 077; wg genkey | tee privatekey | wg pubkey > publickey
root@raspberrypi:/etc/wireguard# cat publickey
RQpa/+3yg35Vj1u/Vj6IAVzmFDzxB6ue731ls3tnek0=
root@raspberrypi:/etc/wireguard# exit

Note the public key that is output in the last line. Your public key will look different. At this point I need to add your public key and stargate to subspace before you can continue the setup.

Step 4 – Send the information to Kristian

For your stargate to appear in the list of available stargates on top of this page, you need to send the gathered information to kristian@thestargateproject.com so that I can enter the information in the database. Only the name/planet, stargate address (represented with symbols) and offline/online status will be visible to the world. Just type up an email using “New stargate” as the subject and supply the following information:

Subject: New Stargate
Name/planet: <The name you want in the "address book">
Stargate address: <Your chosen stargate address>
Public key: <The public key as it is output in Step 3 above>
email address: <Your email address>

The email address is put as a note beside your entry in the database. Its purpose is just for verification if you want to change anything in the entry. A tiny security measure to prevent people from modifying the entries of others.

Step 5 – Connecting to subspace (part 2)

When I have received your email, put your information in the database and added your public key to subspace, you will get a reply back. The reply includes an IP address for you to use in subspace. You need to use the following commands to join subspace with your stargate. Remember to substitute YOUR_IP with the IP address you got in the reply from me. If the IP address you received from me was 172.30.0.4 the command should look like this: ip addr add 172.30.0.4/32 dev subspace

sg1@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo -i
root@raspberrypi:~# cd /etc/wireguard/
root@raspberrypi:/etc/wireguard# wg-quick up subspace
root@raspberrypi:/etc/wireguard# wg set subspace private-key privatekey
root@raspberrypi:/etc/wireguard# ip addr add YOUR_IP/32 dev subspace
root@raspberrypi:/etc/wireguard# wg-quick save subspace
root@raspberrypi:/etc/wireguard# systemctl enable wg-quick@subspace
root@raspberrypi:/etc/wireguard# exit
sg1@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo reboot

When your pi boots up it will automatically enter subspace and be ready for accepting incoming wormholes and dialing other gates in subspace. Check the address list on top of this page. It will take up to ten minutes before your gate shows as online. If you want to verify and check if everything is okay i recommend having a look in the sg1.log file in the sg1 folder. You can monitor this file for any actions with the following command:

sg1@raspberrypi:~ $ tail -f /home/sg1/sg1/sg1.log

If you are receiving an incoming wormhole, you can see who is calling in the log.